Looking to Build Your Network? Please Avoid This 1 Mistake

by Naga Sunder

Networking isn’t just about meeting new individuals. It’s also about you maintain connections. Ignoring the current connections of your professional network because you’re excessively focused on development is a big blunder. Don’t just consider about meeting and getting to know new professional contacts. Don’t fail to remember to keep up with the people you by now know.

Try not to be too unbending when it comes to networking, either. Remember that friends are a part of your professional group. Anyone who knows you, and knows what you do for a living, have the prospect to help you in your career in some means and at some point. You never know where a break – or even just a great idea – might come from.


Networking events are just not worth your time.

Helping others should be a normal extension of every business leader’s responsibilities. Regrettably, it doesn’t come as easy as you would reflect. As leaders, we frequently get too occupied up in business or our own challenges to give individuals the support they need. However, there are realizations in the due course that most of the preeminent clients, partners, and relationships have come for people by helping somebody.

One of the easiest ways to help others is to purely share your knowledge. You don’t have to be in front of a classroom to lecture. Every day there is a chance to edify someone about your area of expertise. The means is to keep educating yourself so you can stay ahead of the curve.

The number one rule of helping connections should be to find out what’s in reality important to someone. You may spend time and endeavor helping someone with something that they didn’t even want help with. Make an attempt to ask them where they need aid, and keep that in mind when you see an occasion.

Think about the resources you’ve invested in and be watchful of whether they can help someone else. Maybe an engineer on your group has some extra time and one of your contacts required some help on a swift job. Or, perhaps you have some game season tickets and there’s a match that you won’t be able to go to. Keep those under- or vacant reserves in the back of your memory and try to connect them to individuals who can use them.

Join groups that interest you.

Despite the know-how and devices that we have obtainable to us today, there is still not anything quite like connecting with others in self. Encircling yourself with individuals who you have things in common with can help you rise both in your career and personal life.

Networking fosters professional growth, helps you gain access to career resources, and can even bring in you to new lifelong friends. In a personal experience, networking has helped many connect with others who I never would have met if it weren’t for a networking group. These individuals have shared their understanding with them and offered them with ideas to help them grow professionally. On a personal level, they have shaped new friendships and have learned to make bigger myself beyond their comfort zone.

Whether you are an organizational assistant, paralegal, office manager, graphic designer, instructor, or salesperson, chances are high that there is a professional association for your field of work. Meeting frequently with others in your industry can help build reliability in your field and help you stay on top of the latest tools and information. If you can’t find involvement in your area, get together with others in your profession and start one. Worried about mingling with your competition? There is copiousness of clients and business to go around and connecting with those in your field can actually help you – you will likely be able to find better professional opportunities through the community you meet.

What is true networking?

Attending networking events and going to local meet-ups is a vast way to meet new people, but it isn’t a good way to get to know someone. Meetings don’t have to about work. Talking about money or business all the time gets dreary. If you want to be unbeaten at networking you have to make personal relationships and not just business relationships. You can do this by talking about wide-ranging topics such as sports, family, or anything you think may interest the other person.

Once you conclude your first meeting you’ll perceive that you are building a friendship and not just a business relationship. This is the covert with networking because if a friend asks you for something, you are more likely to do something for them contrast to if a business colleague asked you for something.

And finally, you’ll want to have many more meetings with the same individual. You never make great friendships over one meeting you build friendships over the years. So don’t expect your networking to pay off within not many weeks or months, it can take years before you see an ROI